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Moscad / Darcom

MOSCAD is a combination Remote Terminal Unit, Programmable Logic Controller, and Communication System. Its unique capabilities make it the ideal product solution for radio-based SCADA systems.

MOSCAD Key Benefits

  • Complete over-the-air programming
  • Interfaces with most MMI's such as Intellution and Wonderware
  • Perform virtually any level of control, including PID, Feedforward, Feedback
  • VHF, UHF, Spread-Spectrum, Trunk, 900 MAS, Microwave & Satellite

 

TRC Provides Motorola Authorized Service

  • Emergency Service: 24hr/Day, 7 Day/Week : 714-542-1004
  • Motorola MOSCAD Parts and Service at Discount Prices
  • Radio Path Studies and On-Site Radio Service
  • Authorized Motorola Training

MOSCAD Capabilities & Specifications

MOSCAD (MOtorola SCADa) is the Motorola product specifically designed to the requirements of Fixed Data systems. At the core of MOSCAD is the 68000-based CPU module, complete with RAM, ROM, real-time-clock, RS-232 and RS-485 data ports, and a communication port. Plug-in specialized I/O modules provide the connectivity to digital (binary) and analog (value) sensors, and provide relay (to control devices) and analog (to change process setpoint) outputs. Modularity permits the MOSCAD configuration at every site to be optimized to the specific requirements of the site. Connectivity via the RS-232 and RS-485 ports to devices capable of serial data communication is also available.

MOSCAD provides the features of both a Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). If the application program loaded into the CPU module is simple, then MOSCAD functions as an RTU; if the application program implements decision-making code, then MOSCAD functions as a PLC. Either type of application program is created by the Programming Toolbox, the created code compiled, and later downloaded into the CPU module.

The application resident within any local or remote MOSCAD unit may be monitored via the Programming Toolbox. When monitoring the local MOSCAD unit, the Toolbox plugs into an available RS-232 port on that CPU module. When monitoring a remote MOSCAD unit, the Toolbox connects to an RS-232 port on any local MOSCAD unit and utilizes the communication network to access the desired remote MOSCAD unit. New application codes may be downloaded to the MOSCAD CPU; current or historical data may be uploaded from the CPU; the contents of the CPU's error logger may be retrieved.

MOSCAD is a combination Remote Terminal Unit, Programmable Logic Controller, and Communication System. Its unique capabilities make it the ideal product solution for radio-based SCADA systems.

Key Benefits

  • Complete over-the-air programming
  • Interfaces with most MMI's such as Intellution and Wonderware
  • Perform virtually any level of control, including PID, Feedforward, Feedback
  • VHF, UHF, Spread-Spectrum, Trunk, 900 MAS, Microwave & Satellite

Capabilities

MOSCAD (MOtorola SCADa) is the Motorola product specifically designed to the requirements of Fixed Data systems. At the core of MOSCAD is the 68000-based CPU module, complete with RAM, ROM, real-time-clock, RS-232 and RS-485 data ports, and a communication port. Plug-in specialized I/O modules provide the connectivity to digital (binary) and analog (value) sensors, and provide relay (to control devices) and analog (to change process setpoint) outputs. Modularity permits the MOSCAD configuration at every site to be optimized to the specific requirements of the site. Connectivity via the RS-232 and RS-485 ports to devices capable of serial data communication is also available.

MOSCAD provides the features of both a Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). If the application program loaded into the CPU module is simple, then MOSCAD functions as an RTU; if the application program implements decision-making code, then MOSCAD functions as a PLC. Either type of application program is created by the Programming Toolbox, the created code compiled, and later downloaded into the CPU module.

The application resident within any local or remote MOSCAD unit may be monitored via the Programming Toolbox. When monitoring the local MOSCAD unit, the Toolbox plugs into an available RS-232 port on that CPU module. When monitoring a remote MOSCAD unit, the Toolbox connects to an RS-232 port on any local MOSCAD unit and utilizes the communication network to access the desired remote MOSCAD unit. New application codes may be downloaded to the MOSCAD CPU; current or historical data may be uploaded from the CPU; the contents of the CPU's error logger may be retrieved.

DARCOM

DARCOM 9000 provides radio-based data communications to SCADA equipment that normally operates on wireline. It uses the 900 MHz frequencies available exclusively for data communications in many countries. It supports both point-to-point and point-to-multipoint (multiple address) system applications.

Darcom General Operation and Specifications:

  • Point-to-Point describes a class of service where two data units exclusively share a communications channel. All messages on the channel occur between these two units. This is analogous to a wire communication channel between a terminal with modem and a host computer. DARCOM point-to-point systems frequently replace the wire communication channel in that example.
  • DARCOM point-to-point equipment may also be used to link the host computer to the master-site radio in a point-to-multipoint communications system (advantageous when the host computer is located at a site that cannot directly communicate with the remote sites). The point-to-point equipment effectively connects the host computer to the now-distant master radio which, in turn, communicates with the remote data terminals.

  • Point-to-Multipoint describes a class of service wherein one master data site communicates with several remote data sites over a single communications channel. Further, the remote sites communicate only with the master site, not with each other. Implicit within the multipoint system concept is addressability (the protocol employed must specify which of the many remote sites is expected to respond to the message) and non-exclusivity (the data protocol and equipment must tolerate messages on the communication channel addressed to others).
  • DARCOM point-to-multipoint systems require the remote data terminals to share the single communications channel. Because they share the channel, they are not in continuous communications with the master site and typically may not initiate data message activity. Point-to-multipoint systems commonly operate in a host-controlled polling mode.

 

  • Network Diagnostics is an increasingly essential aspect of automated communication systems. The DARCOM diagnostics system periodically measures certain parameters of the radio communications equipment to detect problems before they become system-crashing failures. The diagnostics activity may be programmed to occur automatically at infrequent intervals, thereby disrupting normal data activity as little as possible, or the diagnostics activity may be initiated manually when required.
  • Testing a single remote DARCOM radio takes three to five seconds depending upon how extensive a test is conducted; the normal system data activity is suspended at all sites during a test of any single site. Data returned from the remote site includes transmitter power, received signal strength, temperature, and more. Commands may be sent to the remote DARCOM radio that adjusts its transmitter power, deviation, frequency, and more to correct detected problems. The collected data is archived within the diagnostics computer and may later be abstracted to observe any long-term trends.

 

  • Protocol Requirements have been established to assist system designers determine if the existing data equipment will operate satisfactorily with the DARCOM radio equipment. Proper operation may be expected when the protocol uses asynchronous communications at 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 bps, with either 1 or 2 stop bits, provided that the data terminal waits for Clear-to-Send after asserting Request-to-Send. DARCOM will strip the start and stop bits and send the remaining data synchronously to all other DARCOM radios where the start and stop bits are replaced and the asynchronous data delivered to the connected data equipment. Half-duplex radio communications is used so the modems train (synchronize) at the beginning of every transmission.
  • Synchronous data transfer at these same data speeds may also occur. The DARCOM modem will provide clock signal to, or accept clock signal from, the data terminal. The data input is not buffered but immediately transmitted in the same manner described above. And, bit-oriented protocols may be accepted at data speeds through 9600 bps.
  • Existing wireline modems operating at 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 bps may be used with DARCOM radios (no internal modem). A special cable passes the Request-to-Send signal from the data terminal first to the radio so the keyup and training process may begin and later to the modem so it may begin the data transfer. Data Operated Key (DOX) may also be used.

Specifications:

Frequency Range:
Point-to-Point
Point-to-Multipoint
932.5-935 MHz, 941.5-949 MHz (in pairs)
928-929 MHz, 952-953 MHz (in pairs)

Transmitter:
Power Output
Duty Cycle

0.5 to 5 Watts
Master radio: continuous
Remote radio: 50%
Turn-On Time < 1 msec.
Receive Sensitivity:
-119 dBm (SINAD)
Minimum Signal Strength for
10-6 Bit Error Rate at:

 

1200/2400 bps
4800 bps
9600 bps

Channel Spacing

Environmental:
Temperature
Humidity

-114 dBm
-111 dBm
-109 dBm

12.5 or 25 kHz

-30 to +60° C
95% R.H.